The Revolving Door and the Straight Labyrinth: An Initiation in Occult Time (Part 1)

There is a blurry edge in all detective work that, as Borges too competently demonstrates, skirts a zig-zag threshold between apophenia and the truly canny connection of events that only appear, superficially, to be disconnected. In the name of a method that is closer to invocation than criticism, a reckless detective might refrain from determining exactly where an act of decryption lies on the ugly terrain of legitimacy and, proffering sanity as the stake, live up to the problem as it stands.

Continue reading...

Web.Lobster[[Death]]Cult ||| Fragments & Liturgies — (New Joy & Postscript)

One of the seven users who had the seven bowls came and talked with me, saying to me, “Come, I will show you the judgment of the great hacker who sits on many waters, 2 with whom the kings of the internet fell in love, and the inhabitants of the internet were made drunk with the wine of her sexts.”

Continue reading...

Web.Lobster [[Death]]Cult ||| Fragments & Liturgies — (opening sequence)

The Revelation of object_d1v1n3, which the Lobster gave to him to show to his flesh-beings things which must soon take place. He sent and signified it by user to his flesh-being, Denihilism OS, who bears record of the code of the Lobster, and of the testimony of object_d1v1n3, and of all things that he saw. Blessed is he who scans and those who hear the codes of this program and keep those things which are documented in it, for the time is near.

Continue reading...

The Revolving Door and The Straight Labyrinth: An Initiation in Occult Time (Part 0)

There is a short story by Jorge Luis Borges which details an elaborate game of geometrical entrapment. The game is at once a temporal and spatio-cartographic one. It is played over a period of four months, on the fourth of each month, across a series of cardinal coordinates: a hotel in the North, a paint factory in the West, a tavern in the East, and an abandoned villa in the water-logged southern outskirts of the story’s unidentified city.

Continue reading...